Los Angeles State Historic Park



Field Operations with Morphosis proposed a bold vision for the creation of a magnificent large-scale open space in Los Angeles. Given its central location, the Cornfield site offers a fantastic potential to reconfigure this entire sector of Los Angeles, focusing new development around a contiguous 1,000 acre park, conjoining the Cornfields with Elysian park, the LA River and Taylor Yards. If this new ensemble were to extend to Griffith Park, the aggregate sum would exceed 5,000 acres -- the world’s largest contiguous urban park.

Posted: Sep 7th, 2011 / Last Edited: Feb 4th, 2013 Print

Description

  • A RADICAL PROPOSAL / A PRACTICAL SOLUTION:
    This is a bold vision for the creation of a magnificent large-scale open space in Los Angeles.

    We believe a radical proposal is necessary because of the following five challenges:

    • Financing: there is very little money for parks and open space in Los Angeles; there needs to be an effective way for generating large amounts of money for park creation and long-term maintenance;
    • Connectivity: the cornfield site is presently isolated from the larger metropolitan context; it is also quite small and could offer greater potential and significance if it could be connected to Elysian Park, the Los Angeles River corridor and the neighborhoods;
    • Demand for recreational space: Elysian Park is presently under-utilized with very few designated facilities for active recreation; it needs to be invigorated with new uses and amenities;
    • Residential population: the residential population of the surrounding neighborhoods and downtown is markedly low compared to many other city cores, meaning that many commuting times and vehicular congestion are exacerbated; there needs to be the development of newer high density residential neighborhoods, with corresponding public services and amenities;
    • The stadium: Dodger Stadium is presently 100% car dependent and isolated urbanistically. If relocated as part of a neighborhood fabric and connected to mass-transit, it could free-up a site of significant development and open space potential while contributing to the economic revitalization of the city.

    Given its central location, the Cornfield site offers a fantastic potential to reconfigure this entire sector of Los Angeles, focusing new development around a contiguous 1,000 acre park, conjoining the Cornfields with Elysian park, the LA River and Taylor Yards. If this new ensemble were to extend to Griffith Park, the aggregate sum would exceed 5,000 acres -- the world’s largest contiguous urban park.


    THE LAND SWAP
    To begin, we propose a typical Los Angeles story – a grand land swap.

    By moving Dodger Stadium and freeing up 265 acres of raised land with spectacular views across the Los Angeles basin, we can provide a new mixed-use residential neighborhood for up to 12,500 new units, 25,000 new residents and 200 acres of new green open space to be added to Elysian Park. This strategy enlarges the aggregate park area while providing a significant source of immediate capital and long-term revenue.

    Dodger Stadium is here relocated to the Chinatown end of the Cornfield site, capitalizing upon adjacent neighborhood amenities (restaurants, shops, hotels) and nearby mass transit stops (both the Gold Line and Union Station). Parking for the stadium is decked for 4 levels, the roof of which allows for an elevated public park, with direct connection over the 110 freeway to Elysian Park and over to the LA River corridor.

    This land swap could provide approximately $350 million for the re-design of the elevated Cornfield park site and the enhancement of Elysian Park, and could continue to provide between $10-15 million per year for ongoing park operations and maintenance.

    Additional development of the North Industrial District could allow for the development of new hotels, retail, commercial and residential uses in support of the stadium while overlooking the park. Money from this development could also be put toward the creation of a new LA River Park inlet, with riparian habitat, nature educational facilities, fishing and walking paths.

    In the end, the green open space could grow from the present-day aggregate of 650 acres (most of which is under-utilized and vacant) to 1,000 acres (newly designed and inter-connected as a contiguous park).

    AT NEARLY ONE-AND-A-HALF TIMES THE SIZE OF NEW YORK’S CENTRAL PARK, LOS ANGELES COULD CREATE ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST AND MOST DIVERSE PUBLIC PARKS IN ANY METROPOLITAN AREA.


  • A RADICAL PROPOSAL / A PRACTICAL SOLUTION:
    This is a bold vision for the creation of a magnificent large-scale open space in Los Angeles.

    We believe a radical proposal is necessary because of the following five challenges:

    • Financing: there is very little money for parks and open space in Los Angeles; there needs to be an effective way for generating large amounts of money for park creation and long-term maintenance;
    • Connectivity: the cornfield site is presently isolated from the larger metropolitan context; it is also quite small and could offer greater potential and significance if it could be connected to Elysian Park, the Los Angeles River corridor and the neighborhoods;
    • Demand for recreational space: Elysian Park is presently under-utilized with very few designated facilities for active recreation; it needs to be invigorated with new uses and amenities;
    • Residential population: the residential population of the surrounding neighborhoods and downtown is markedly low compared to many other city cores, meaning that many commuting times and vehicular congestion are exacerbated; there needs to be the development of newer high density residential neighborhoods, with corresponding public services and amenities;
    • The stadium: Dodger Stadium is presently 100% car dependent and isolated urbanistically. If relocated as part of a neighborhood fabric and connected to mass-transit, it could free-up a site of significant development and open space potential while contributing to the economic revitalization of the city.

    Given its central location, the Cornfield site offers a fantastic potential to reconfigure this entire sector of Los Angeles, focusing new development around a contiguous 1,000 acre park, conjoining the Cornfields with Elysian park, the LA River and Taylor Yards. If this new ensemble were to extend to Griffith Park, the aggregate sum would exceed 5,000 acres -- the world’s largest contiguous urban park.


    THE LAND SWAP
    To begin, we propose a typical Los Angeles story – a grand land swap.

    By moving Dodger Stadium and freeing up 265 acres of raised land with spectacular views across the Los Angeles basin, we can provide a new mixed-use residential neighborhood for up to 12,500 new units, 25,000 new residents and 200 acres of new green open space to be added to Elysian Park. This strategy enlarges the aggregate park area while providing a significant source of immediate capital and long-term revenue.

    Dodger Stadium is here relocated to the Chinatown end of the Cornfield site, capitalizing upon adjacent neighborhood amenities (restaurants, shops, hotels) and nearby mass transit stops (both the Gold Line and Union Station). Parking for the stadium is decked for 4 levels, the roof of which allows for an elevated public park, with direct connection over the 110 freeway to Elysian Park and over to the LA River corridor.

    This land swap could provide approximately $350 million for the re-design of the elevated Cornfield park site and the enhancement of Elysian Park, and could continue to provide between $10-15 million per year for ongoing park operations and maintenance.

    Additional development of the North Industrial District could allow for the development of new hotels, retail, commercial and residential uses in support of the stadium while overlooking the park. Money from this development could also be put toward the creation of a new LA River Park inlet, with riparian habitat, nature educational facilities, fishing and walking paths.

    In the end, the green open space could grow from the present-day aggregate of 650 acres (most of which is under-utilized and vacant) to 1,000 acres (newly designed and inter-connected as a contiguous park).

    AT NEARLY ONE-AND-A-HALF TIMES THE SIZE OF NEW YORK’S CENTRAL PARK, LOS ANGELES COULD CREATE ONE OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST AND MOST DIVERSE PUBLIC PARKS IN ANY METROPOLITAN AREA.


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Details

Location:
Los Angeles, California, United States of America
Client:
California State Parks
Site Area:
5,150.0 acres / 2,084.2 hectares
Program:
Regional park / A mixed-use residential development, recreation facilities, and neighborhood park / Park as a connective deck, Dodger Stadium, parking
Type:
  • Urban Planning and Design

Project Credits

Collaborators
Consultants
Competition Proposal and Design Lead
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